Definition of Magnet

1. Noun. (physics) a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field.




2. Noun. A characteristic that provides pleasure and attracts. "Flowers are an attractor for bees"
Exact synonyms: Attracter, Attraction, Attractive Feature, Attractor
Generic synonyms: Characteristic, Feature
Specialized synonyms: Attention, Tourist Attraction
Derivative terms: Attract, Attract, Attract, Magnetic

Definition of Magnet

1. n. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; -- called also natural magnet.

Definition of Magnet

1. Noun. A piece of material that attracts some metals by magnetism. ¹

2. Noun. (context: informal figuratively preceded by a noun) A person or thing that attracts what is denoted by the preceding noun. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Magnet

1. a body that possesses the property of attracting iron [n -S]

Medical Definition of Magnet

1. 1. The loadstone; a species of iron ore (the ferrosoferric or magnetic ore, Fe3O4) which has the property of attracting iron and some of its ores, and, when freely suspended, of pointing to the poles; called also natural magnet. "Dinocrates began to make the arched roof of the temple of Arsinoe all of magnet, or this loadstone." (Holland) "Two magnets, heaven and earth, allure to bliss, The larger loadstone that, the nearer this." (Dryden) 2. A bar or mass of steel or iron to which the peculiar properties of the loadstone have been imparted; called, in distinction from the loadstone, an artificial magnet. An artificial magnet, produced by the action of a voltaic or electrical battery, is called an electromagnet. Field magnet, a magnet used for producing and maintaining a magnetic field; used especially of the stationary or exciting magnet of a dynamo or electromotor in distinction from that of the moving portion or armature. Origin: OE. Magnete, OF. Magnete, L. Magnes, -etis, Gr. A magnet, metal that looked like silver, prop, Magnesian stone, fr. Gr, a country in Thessaly. Cf. Magnesia, Manganese. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Magnet Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Magnet

magnesium protoporphyrin monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase
magnesium ribbon
magnesium salicylate
magnesium silicate
magnesium silicates
magnesium stearate
magnesium sulfate
magnesium sulfates
magnesium sulfide
magnesium sulphate
magnesium sulphide
magnesium trisilicate
magnesium wire
magnesiumlike
magnesiums
magnet (current term)
magnet-
magnet reaction
magnet reflex
magnet school
magnetabsorption
magnetar
magnetars
magnetelastic
magnetelectrical
magnetencephalographies
magnetencephalography
magnetic
magnetic North Pole
magnetic anisotropy

Literary usage of Magnet

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism by James Clerk Maxwell (1904)
"direction, BO as to bring the axis of the magnet as near as possible to the ... If the middle of a- long thin magnet be examined, it is found to possess no ..."

2. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"In general, one magnet will suffice, placed vertically under or over the ... For convenience this magnet should be mounted on a vertical graduated rod, ..."

3. Nature by Nature Publishing Group, Norman Lockyer (1883)
"This deflection is noted and the deflecting magnet turned end for end, ... Make in the same way a pair of observations with the magnet at the same distance ..."

4. The Electrical Review (1878)
"The system of power about the magnet must not be considered as revolving ... The magnet may even, in certain cases, be considered as revolving among its own ..."

5. Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society by Cambridge Philosophical Society (1904)
"But when the fields are far from being uniform the vibrating magnet must be quite ... The magnet must also be slender, for unless its length be at least 10 ..."

6. Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge (1901)
"When thus suspended, let us now try the effect of another magnet upon it, and we shall find that the pole of the suspended magnet which is attracted by one ..."

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