Definition of Maniple

1. n. A handful.



Definition of Maniple

1. Noun. (rare) A handful. ¹

2. Noun. A division of the Roman army numbering 60 or 120 men exclusive of officers, any small body of soldiers; a company. ¹

3. Noun. Originally, a napkin; later, an ornamental band or scarf worn upon the left arm as a part of the vestments of a priest in the Roman Catholic Church, and sometimes worn in the English Church service. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Maniple

1. a silk band worn on the left arm as a vestment [n -S]

Medical Definition of Maniple

1. 1. A handful. 2. A division of the Roman army numbering sixty men exclusive of officers, any small body of soldiers; a company. 3. Originally, a napkin; later, an ornamental band or scarf worn upon the left arm as a part of the vestments of a priest in the Roman Catholic Church. It is sometimes worn in the English Church service. Origin: L. Manipulus, maniplus, a handful, a certain number of soldiers; manus hand + root of plere to fill, plenus full: cf. F.maniple. See Manual, and Full. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Maniple

manillas
manille
manilles
manimals
maniness
maninose
maninoses
manioc
manioca
maniocas
maniocs
maniped
manipeds
maniphalanx
maniple (current term)
maniples
manipulability
manipulable
manipulably
manipulandum
manipular
manipulars
manipulatable
manipulate
manipulated
manipulated variable
manipulatee
manipulates
manipulating

Literary usage of Maniple

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"By the beginning of the ninth century the use of the maniple was almost ... The use of the maniple in Gaul and Germany is proved by the statements of ..."

2. A Dictionary of Christian Antiquities: Comprising the History, Institutions by William Smith, Samuel Cheetham (1880)
"18), who, writing early in the 9th century, speaks of the maniple as the ... 1099) commenting on the maniple under the name sudarium, and entering at length ..."

3. An universal etymological English dictionaryby Nathan Bailey by Nathan Bailey (1724)
"maniple, a kind of Ornament like > Scarf, «orn about their ... L-1 be- longing то a maniple. MANNA, l|Q, H. ». i. ..."

4. Divine Worship in England in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries by John David Chambers (1877)
"None of them are more than 2^- inches wide, and all are fringed at the extremities, and the work upon them is flight. maniple ..."

5. An Elementary Latin Dictionary by Charlton Thomas Lewis (1890)
"As subst. т., a soldier of a maniple, common soldier: tam- quam unus ... Of soldiers, a company, maniple, one third of a cohort ( its standard originally ..."

6. The Brasses of England by Herbert Walter Macklin (1907)
"Stole and maniple almost always match, and are of the same breadth, the pattern being continued throughout the entire length, with sometimes a STOLE FROM ..."

7. Monuments of the Early Church by Walter Lowrie (1906)
"THE STOLE AND THE maniple The fashion of ... furnishes again the explanation of the development of the stole and maniple, as ornamental insignia of office, ..."

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