Definition of Motes

1. Noun. (plural of mote) ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Motes

1. mote [n] - See also: mote

Lexicographical Neighbors of Motes

motard
motards
motation
motations
motavizumab
motccil
mote
moted
motel room
motelier
moteliers
motelike
motels
moten
motes (current term)
motesanib
motet
motets
motett
motetts
motey
moth
moth-eaten
moth-eaten alopecia
moth-er
moth-resistant
moth bean
moth miller
moth mullein

Literary usage of Motes

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Scientific Papers by John William Strutt Rayleigh (1902)
"Separation of motes. In the course of some experiments last year, ... The lower, more aqueous, layer was charged with motes, while the upper, more ethereal, ..."

2. Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland by Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (1891)
"I have proved during my investigation that fully thirty motes and Forts—many of them fairly complete and conspicuously situated—have been entirely omitted, ..."

3. The American and English Railroad Cases: A Collection of All Cases Affecting by Frank Cyrus Smith, Thomas Johnson Michie, United States Courts, Great Britain Courts, Canada Courts (1903)
"motes from the lantern of the brakeman, and the conductor then signaled the ... Action by Isaac motes against the Central of Georgia Railway Company. ..."

4. Bleaching and Related Processes as Applied to Textile Fibers and Other Materials by Joseph Merritt Matthews (1921)
"and 0.8 kg. chloride of lime; strength = 59.7 kg.; motes and shives not completely ... and I kg. kaolin; strength = 50.3 kg.; motes and shives completely ..."

5. Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland by Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (1905)
"We have found—(1) that mention of a fort at the site of an existing mote is common in pre-Norman documents; (2) that early writers considered such motes as ..."

6. The World Book: Organized Knowledge in Story and Picture edited by Michael Vincent O'Shea, Ellsworth D. Foster, George Herbert Locke (1918)
"Broadly speaking, atmospheric dust may be classed as consisting of two kinds: the dust motes or floating matter of the air, and the flying dust that is ..."

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