Definition of Ordinate

1. Noun. The value of a coordinate on the vertical axis.

Generic synonyms: Cartesian Coordinate



2. Verb. Appoint to a clerical posts. "He was ordained in the Church"
Exact synonyms: Consecrate, Ordain, Order
Generic synonyms: Enthrone, Invest, Vest
Derivative terms: Consecration, Consecration, Ordainer, Ordinance, Order

3. Verb. Bring (components or parts) into proper or desirable coordination correlation. "Ordinate similar parts"
Exact synonyms: Align, Coordinate
Generic synonyms: Adjust, Correct, Set
Specialized synonyms: Misalign
Derivative terms: Alignment, Coordination

Definition of Ordinate

1. a. Well-ordered; orderly; regular; methodical.

2. n. The distance of any point in a curve or a straight line, measured on a line called the axis of ordinates or on a line parallel to it, from another line called the axis of abscissas, on which the corresponding abscissa of the point is measured.

3. v. t. To appoint, to regulate; to harmonize.

Definition of Ordinate

1. Noun. (mathematics) the value of a coordinate on the vertical (Y) axis ¹

2. Verb. (transitive) to ordain a priest, or consecrate a bishop ¹

3. Verb. (transitive) to align a series of objects ¹

4. Adjective. arranged regularly in rows; orderly; disposed or arranged in an orderly or regular fashion. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Ordinate

1. a particular geometric coordinate [n -S]

Medical Definition of Ordinate

1. Well-ordered; orderly; regular; methodical. "A life blissful and ordinate. " Ordinate figure, a figure whose sides and angles are equal; a regular figure. Origin: L. Ordinatus, p. P. Of ordinare. See Ordain. The distance of any point in a curve or a straight line, measured on a line called the axis of ordinates or on a line parallel to it, from another line called the axis of abscissas, on which the corresponding abscissa of the point is measured. The ordinate and abscissa, taken together, are called coordinates, and define the position of the point with reference to the two axes named, the intersection of which is called the origin of coordinates. See Coordinate. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Ordinate Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Ordinate

ordinarinesses
ordinarity
ordinars
ordinary annuity
ordinary bicycle
ordinary care
ordinary differential equation
ordinary differential equations
ordinary high water mark
ordinary life insurance
ordinary resolution
ordinary seaman
ordinary seamen
ordinary shares
ordinate (current term)
ordinated
ordinately
ordinates
ordinating
ordination
ordinations
ordinative
ordinator
ordinators
ordinaunce
ordinee
ordinees
ordines
ordnance

Literary usage of Ordinate

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. English Grammar: The English Language in Its Elements and Forms ; with a by William Chauncey Fowler (1855)
"I. COPULATE CO-ordinate SENTENCES are those which are connected by the ... An ADVERSATIVE CO-ordinate SENTENCE is one in which the clauses that are ..."

2. Report of the Annual Meeting (1880)
"This, added to the length previously laid off on the first ordinate, gives the area up to the third ordinate, and is set off ..."

3. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: “a” Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature edited by Hugh Chisholm (1911)
"It therefore appears as a calculated length rather than as a definite line in the figure; except that, if there is only one ordinate of this length, ..."

4. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry by Leonard Magruder Passano (1918)
"Abscissa, ordinate, and Distance. Consider an angle, positive or negative, of any magnitude whatever*, ХОР, of Fig. 2. From P, any point in the terminal ..."

5. Miscellaneous Works of the Late Thomas Young by Thomas Young (1855)
"And that it would always remain equal to this velocity, so that the density of the medium might always be expressed by the mean ordinate, may be shown ..."

6. A Treatise on Universal Algebra: With Applications by Alfred North Whitehead (1898)
"(3) A subregion is called a co-ordinate region when, being itself of p — 1 dimensions, p of the co-ordinate (or reference) elements of the complete region ..."

7. An Elementary Treatise on the Calculus: With Illustrations from Geometry by George Alexander Gibson (1901)
"5), for in that case the ordinate/(— a.) of the point whose abscissa is —a is equal in sign and in magnitude to the ordinate ..."

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