Definition of Pitch accent

1. Noun. Emphasis that results from pitch rather than loudness.

Exact synonyms: Tonic Accent
Generic synonyms: Accent, Emphasis, Stress



Definition of Pitch accent

1. Noun. (linguistics) A term of convenience for a variety of restricted tone systems that use variations in pitch to give prominence to a syllable or mora within a word. The placement of this tone or the way it is realized can give different meanings to otherwise similar words. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Pitch Accent Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Pitch Accent

pitarah
pitarahs
pitaras
pitas
pitavastatin
pitaya
pitayas
pitcairn island
pitch-black
pitch-dark
pitch-ore
pitch a fit
pitch a tent
pitch accent (current term)
pitch and putt
pitch angle
pitch angle scattering
pitch apple
pitch around
pitch black
pitch blackness
pitch contour
pitch count
pitch counts
pitch dark
pitch discrimination

Literary usage of Pitch accent

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1910)
"Modern Greek has changed from pitch to stress, the stress being generally laid upon- the same syllable in modern as bore the pitch accent in ancient Greek. ..."

2. A Short Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Students by Peter Giles (1901)
"(2) Pitch-accent, also known as musical or Pitch-accent. . chromatic accent, ... ^^11^ according as the stress or the pitch-accent is the more prominent. ..."

3. Classical Philology by University of Chicago press, JSTOR (Organization) (1908)
"Like the worthy Mrs. Bouncer in the well-known comedy, our philologists have used their utmost ingenuity to prevent the pitch-accent and the stress-accent ..."

4. Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association by American philological association (1885)
"The course of development of the ancient pitch- accent into the modern Greek stress-accent is obscure ; it may be that even in the ancient speech the ..."

5. The Latin Language: An Historical Account of Latin Sounds, Stems and Flexions by Wallace Martin Lindsay (1894)
"Most languages do indeed combine in a greater or less degree pitch-accent with stress- accent. The accented syllable, if pronounced with more energy than ..."

6. Transactions of the Philological Society by Philological Society (Great Britain). (1888)
"In Latin, as in English, the stress- accent was more powerful than the pitch-accent, while in Greek the reverse was the case ; hence the difference of ..."

7. The Encyclopedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and by Hugh Chisholm (1910)
"Modem Greek has changed from pitch to stress, the stress being generally laid upon the same syllable in modem as bore the pitch accent in ancient Greek. ..."

8. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1910)
"Modern Greek has changed from pitch to stress, the stress being generally laid upon- the same syllable in modern as bore the pitch accent in ancient Greek. ..."

9. A Short Manual of Comparative Philology for Classical Students by Peter Giles (1901)
"(2) Pitch-accent, also known as musical or Pitch-accent. . chromatic accent, ... ^^11^ according as the stress or the pitch-accent is the more prominent. ..."

10. Classical Philology by University of Chicago press, JSTOR (Organization) (1908)
"Like the worthy Mrs. Bouncer in the well-known comedy, our philologists have used their utmost ingenuity to prevent the pitch-accent and the stress-accent ..."

11. Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association by American philological association (1885)
"The course of development of the ancient pitch- accent into the modern Greek stress-accent is obscure ; it may be that even in the ancient speech the ..."

12. The Latin Language: An Historical Account of Latin Sounds, Stems and Flexions by Wallace Martin Lindsay (1894)
"Most languages do indeed combine in a greater or less degree pitch-accent with stress- accent. The accented syllable, if pronounced with more energy than ..."

13. Transactions of the Philological Society by Philological Society (Great Britain). (1888)
"In Latin, as in English, the stress- accent was more powerful than the pitch-accent, while in Greek the reverse was the case ; hence the difference of ..."

14. The Encyclopedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and by Hugh Chisholm (1910)
"Modem Greek has changed from pitch to stress, the stress being generally laid upon the same syllable in modem as bore the pitch accent in ancient Greek. ..."

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