Definition of Spoliation

1. Noun. (law) the intentional destruction of a document or an alteration of it that destroys its value as evidence.

Generic synonyms: Destruction, Devastation
Category relationships: Jurisprudence, Law
Derivative terms: Spoil



2. Noun. The act of stripping and taking by force.

Definition of Spoliation

1. n. The act of plundering; robbery; deprivation; despoliation.

Definition of Spoliation

1. Noun. The act of plundering or spoiling; robbery; deprivation; despoliation. ¹

2. Noun. Robbery or plunder in times of war; especially, the authorized act or practice of plundering neutrals at sea. ¹

3. Noun. (legal) The intentional destruction of or tampering with (a document) in such way as to impair evidentiary effect. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Spoliation

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Spoliation

1. 1. The act of plundering; robbery; deprivation; despoliation. "Legal spoliation, which will impoverish one part of the community in order to corrupt the remainder." (Sir G. C. Lewis) 2. Robbery or plunder in war; especially, the authorised act or practice of plundering neutrals at sea. 3. The act of an incumbent in taking the fruits of his benefice without right, but under a pretended title. A process for possession of a church in a spiritual court. 4. Injury done to a document. Origin: L. Spoliatio; cf. F. Spoliation. See Spoil. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Spoliation Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Spoliation

spokesmen
spokesmodel
spokesmodels
spokespeople
spokesperson
spokespersons
spokest
spokeswoman
spokeswomen
spokewise
spoking
spoliate
spoliated
spoliates
spoliating
spoliation (current term)
spoliations
spoliative
spoliator
spoliators
spoliatory
spoligotype
spoligotypes
spoligotyping
spondaic
spondaics
spondaise
spondaize
spondee
spondees

Literary usage of Spoliation

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Appletons' Annual Cyclopaedia and Register of Important Events (1871)
"Equally matter of notoriety are the solemn reclamations and protests of the Holy See against that sacrilegious spoliation; reclamations and protests made ..."

2. International Law: A Treatise by Lassa Oppenheim (1906)
"Whatever her cargo may be, a vessel may at once be seized without further search as soon as it becomes apparent that spoliation, defacement, or concealment ..."

3. The Law of Contracts by William Herbert Page (1921)
"Effect of spoliation—Theory that spoliation is without legal effect. The English courts seem to have receded from their original rule ' so far that ..."

4. Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856: From Gales and by United States Congress, Thomas Hart Benton (1859)
"French spoliation» prior to 1800. One of the most revolting features of this ... French spoliation*. The Senate proceeded to the special order of the day, ..."

5. Draft Outlines of an International Code by David Dudley Field (1876)
"4 It is no excuse for spoliation to allege that the papers destroyed were private papers not affecting vessel or cargo. The Two Brothers, 1 Ch. Robinson"» ..."

6. The Cambridge Modern History by John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton Acton, Adolphus William Ward, George Walter Prothero, Ernest Alfred Benians (1904)
"These episcopal changes afforded scope for another sort of ecclesiastical spoliation ; most of the new Bishops were compelled to alienate some of their ..."

7. International Law and the World War by James Wilford Garner (1920)
"More Recent Examples of spoliation. While this appears to have been the last flagrant example of wholesale spoliation of art galleries, ..."

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