Definition of Stumpily

1. Adverb. In a stumpy way. ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Stumpily

1. in a stumpy manner [adv]

Stumpily Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Stumpily

stump orators
stump powder
stump powders
stump speech
stump spud
stump up
stumpage
stumpages
stumped
stumper
stumpers
stumpflite
stumpier
stumpies
stumpiest
stumpily (current term)
stumpiness
stumping
stumpknocker
stumplike
stumpnose
stumpnoses
stumps
stumpwork
stumpy
stums
stun
stun baton
stun gun
stun guns

Literary usage of Stumpily

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Poetic and Dramatic Works of Alfred, Lord Tennyson by Walter Scott, William James Rolfe (1904)
"She is merely standing stumpily. But I am prepared to assert her for the sublimest Mater Dolorosa ever painted, as far as my knowledge extends, ..."

2. Letters of John Ruskin to Charles Eliot Norton by John Ruskin, Charles Eliot Norton (1904)
"She is merely standing stumpily. But I am prepared to assert her for the sublimest Mater Dolorosa ever painted, as far as my knowledge extends, ..."

3. Ariadne Florentina: Six Lectures on Wood and Metal Engraving, with Appendix by John Ruskin (1891)
"She is merely standing stumpily. But I am prepared to assert her for the sublimest Mater Dolorosa ever painted, so far as my knowledge extends, ..."

4. A Naturalist in Mid-Africa: Being an Account of a Journey to the Mountains by George Francis Scott Elliot (1896)
"... containing, apparently, much more guttural and harsh combinations. The people, are shorter and more squarely and stumpily built than the ..."

5. The Complete Works by John Ruskin (1894)
"The second brother, John, thus left the head of the family, was a stumpily made, snub- or rather knob-nosed, red-faced, bright-eyed, good-natured simpleton ..."

6. The Transactions of the Microscopical Society of London by Microscopical Society of London (1859)
"The few straggling hairs which were pulled off the scalp presented no bulb, but were distorted and broken stumpily; tufts of spores were grouped on the ..."

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