Definition of Three-dimensional

1. Adjective. Involving or relating to three dimensions or aspects; giving the illusion of depth. "They shot the movie in three-D"




2. Adjective. Having three dimensions.

Definition of Three-dimensional

1. Adjective. (not comparable) Existing in three dimensions ¹

2. Adjective. (comparable) having depth (or the illusion of depth) as well as height and width ¹

3. Adjective. (comparable) lifelike ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Three-dimensional Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Three-dimensional

three-banded armadillo
three-base hit
three-body collisions
three-card monte
three-card trickster
three-center two-electron bond
three-centered arch
three-cornered
three-cornered bone
three-cornered leek
three-day event
three-day fever
three-day measles
three-decker
three-dimensional (current term)
three-dimensional diffraction pattern
three-dimensional figure
three-dimensional radar
three-dimensional record
three-dimensionality
three-figure
three-finger salute
three-finger salutes
three-flowered
three-fourths
three-headed
three-hitter
three-horned

Literary usage of Three-dimensional

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Journal of the American Chemical Society by American Chemical Society (1879)
"three-dimensional view of the molecular ... three-dimensional diagram of the molecular packing in a unit cell of phenyl(2,2' ..."

2. Projective Geometry by Oswald Veblen, John Wesley Young (1910)
"Projective collineations of three-dimensional forms. Projective collineations in a three-dimensional form have been defined at the beginning of § 28. ..."

3. Projective Geometry by Oswald Veblen, John Wesley Young (1910)
"Projective collineations of three-dimensional forms. Protective collineations in a three-dimensional form have been defined at the beginning of § 28. ..."

4. The Monist by Hegeler Institute (1907)
"We use one-dimensional space to express the dimensions of three-dimensional space. Besides this, it is not altogether accurate to describe space, ..."

5. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1919)
"The mathematician is not in the least concerned, however, whether his two or three dimensional geometry appeals to any visible space or not. ..."

6. The Monist by Hegeler Institute (1921)
"a straight line is the simplest form only from the standpoint of three dimensional space. To get at the nature of space from the assumption of simplicity, ..."

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